Dr. Heba Raouf-Ezzat

Assistant Professor of Political Science, Institute of Alliance of Civilizations, Ibn Haldun University, Turkey

Heba Raouf Ezzat is an Assistant Professor of Political Science at the Institute of Alliance of Civilizations at Ibn Haldun University (IHU) in Istanbul, Turkey. She also teaches at in the Departments of Political Science and Sociology at IHU. For nearly 30 years, she taught political theory at Cairo University. She was also an adjunct professor at the American University in Cairo (2006-2013). She spent two years (2014-2015) at the Civil Society and Human Security Unit at the London School of Economics (LSE) as a visiting fellow before moving to Istanbul – where she is currently based – in 2016. Her academic writings and teaching cover a wide range of topics, including classic and modern Western political thought, Islamic political theory, women and politics, global civil society, urban politics, cities and citizenships, and Middle East politics. Besides her teaching and writings, she co-established a Diploma for Public Policy and Child Rights 2010 that was a project funded by the European Commission and coordinated between four Arab and four European universities. For that effort, she was awarded the Prize for Outstanding Support of German-Egyptian Collaboration in Science and Innovation. Since 2015, Dr. Raouf Ezzat supervised and introduced the full translation of Zygmunt Bauman’s Liquid Modernity series into Arabic. She also translated Ziauddin Sardar’s book Mecca: The Sacred City to Arabic. Her latest work is a research paper on the “Project on the Future of Human Rights in the Arab world” titled, “The Human Rights Movement and the Islamist: The Paths of Convergence and Divergence” with the Arab Reform Initiative/Paris, and forthcoming chapter titled, “Re-imagining Egypt: The State of War” in a book titled, Contemporary Thought in the Middle East (Routledge 2021). Her current research is on the reconfigurations of space in the Egyptian urban planning and urban politics, and the recent rise of Egyptian Ultranationalism.

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